My husband and I bought my great grandmother’s

DWQA QuestionsMy husband and I bought my great grandmother’s

My husband and I bought my great grandmother’s home in 2017. Its a 1500sq ft brick home, built in 1951 and it needs updates for sure (kitchen unlevel, musty, old cabinets, etc.) We have done some, but some DIYs were not done correctly because we didn’t know what we were doing at first. We are considering refinancing our mortgage to be able to renovate.. we bought for a family price, so home is appraised at a bit more than what we paid. I’m thinking we would have about 25-30k we could put into it. We basically need an entire new kitchen, update our bathroom, new flooring, a lot..
My question is, have you gutted a home room by room and DIY your entire home? Would you be willing to share what you had to contract out, and the entire price you paid, if it’s similar to my home size? Any tips? I’m from south TX in case that’s relevant..
My husband thinks we should just sell and move on, but I do love my home. It just needs love. Torn for sure.

17 Answers
Best Answer
answered 3 months ago

Seems like your husband is not in the same mind frame as you. If you sell now, a nice down payment on what you both want. Check out the comps. in your area for same sq. ft as yours to make sure it is worth your while to do all that work and will raise the price but not too high over what area calls for. It will make you happy and be in for a longer term I think if wisely spent on the main rooms you should be able to do it and put in some sweat equity for the stuff you can handle on your own.

answered 3 months ago

Hard to give you an rough estimate but I will say whatever you think it will cost add a little more

answered 3 months ago

We do free estimate AFFORDABLE home improvement michael j Jordan

answered 3 months ago

What a small world, I grew up in PL.

answered 3 months ago

I will tell you this much, my sister and her husband did a renovation of their home, room by room. It wasn’t easy, stuff all over the place, living out of boxes. It was hard on their marriage.

answered 3 months ago

Just depends. Bathrooms and kitchen are the toughest. Your budget is tight for everything you want to do. Might be better off transferring that equity to the next house or be willing to do alot of the work. I have done whole houses in that budget but I do contract electric flooring install and plumbing and plaster work.

answered 3 months ago

My husband and I lived in the back 3 bedrooms of our small home while the other 2/3 of it was gutted from floor to rafters for an extensive remodel that added 400 square feet to the home. We did not have the skills to move walls, remove a fireplace, enclose a patio to make a sunroom, double the size of the kitchen, and much, much more. It was during the hottest time of the year, too. The remodel was so extensive we had to refinance a $68,000 mortgage for $158,000, but the house will be paid off in 2 months after only 16 years. The expense and incovenience was so worth it. The house is now valued at 325,000. Oh, and we had hired an architect for $2K to draw up the plans which helped immensely. Whatever you choose to do, good luck and I hope you have a good experience like we did.

answered 3 months ago

In the process of doing my home (1,300 sq ft) room by room. Started with the master bedroom. Lived in a spear bedroom for about a month during the remodel of the room. Doing everything myself on the weekends and when I was off work. Replaced floor and subfloor new paint and got rid of the popcorn ceiling (highly recommended but a pain to do). So far we haven’t had to contract anything out but I have a friend that just remodeled his entire home himself so he has been helping a lot. Only thing I am possibly going to have to contract out will be the HVAC work. A definite contract out is going to be a new roof and gutters. We spent about $1,300 on our bedroom floor and sub floor with new insulation, ceiling fan, paint, new decor, and replaced most of the receptacles with the exception of one just because it was replaced shortly before the remodel started. The kitchen is looking to be the most expensive thing and we are saving it for last. Only reason for its cost is new appliances that will be stainless steel.

answered 3 months ago

Do what must be done first and save for the rest. Tackle one project at a time and it will be done before you know it.

answered 3 months ago

Ive renovated/ remodeled entire homes for around $40 sq ft. This included all new everything. AC. Roof. Kitchen. Bathrooms. Landscape. Tree work. Garage door. New electrical panel. New floors. New doors. New trim. EVERYTHING lol.

answered 3 months ago

It all depend how far you want to strip out and how much work you’re willing to do your self and the finish your after there is no correct amount of money even as a guess when I started thought be about 60k and iv smashed that only had roofers in to put new roof window firm a plumber for 2 days to hook up a boiler and a sparky to do a wiring diagram and he will come in to finish connecting once iv pulled all cables through I am doing everything myself from 1st fix plumbing to plastering the walls I have built but the cost of materials is the killer

answered 3 months ago

We just re did our kitchen mostly diy.

Had to get help with electrical and a small bit of plumbing.

Ripped out floors, counters, base cabinets, and sink and replaced for about 3 k total.

Rented a floor polisher and painted the polished concrete.

Was a pain in the ass and took about a month. Probably spent at least another grand on take out lol

answered 3 months ago

Personally I’d move on if I had the means to. Old houses are expensive to renovate since everything must be redone – electrical, windows, all the not fun stuff.

answered 3 months ago

I have a 1954 home! We were able to DIY kitchen cabinets. Added some, refinished some, but contracted out the bathroom, exterior doors and windows, outdoor hardscapes and flooring in one room. I think we may try flooring the rest of the house on our own but it definitely took a while warming up to the DIY lifestyle. Lots of small projects here and there have made us more open to takling some of the remaining big stuff though. So total we have replaced 2 windows, 3 doors, siding, flooring in one room, cost of kitchen supplies, new bathroom, solar panels, new attic insulation and outdoor hardscapes we have invested about 65k over 2 years. We did a lot of demo ourselves and cleared/leveled outdoor stuff too, but when plumbing and electrical issues came up there wasn’t much we could do about cost. I expect we still have about 40k in renovations left.

answered 3 months ago

We are renovating a 120 year old farm house that had zero modern conveniences. We have done most things ourselves learning from you tube. It isn’t perfect.. for sure . But it is doable. We did contract out the septic tank, a room addition, roof and hooking the electric to the box.. we have had to rough it a lot. But I’m pleased with how it’s coming along and it can be done.

answered 3 months ago

Do a home equity line of credit. That way you are only paying interest on what you spend. Especially if you do it room by room

answered 3 months ago

I have NOT done what you are going to attempt but I have considered it and talked with those who have. Living in a perpetual construction zone can be very stressful and has a tendency to break marriages. Be careful that you and your spose and rest of your family are committed and it can result in great things. Only some stuff has to be perfect, other stuff only needs to be good enough. “Spackle and paint make a carpenter what he ain’t.”

The things that you definitely want to hire out are anything that needs a permit with inspection to be code. Electrician and Plumber are the biggies as well as foundation repair. You can pull a permit, gut a room, re-wire it being careful to follow code and bring in an electrician for the final hookup (and to fix any mistakes). The mistakes are more costly than the electrician when you realize you used 16ga wire for a 20 amp line and need to replace everything.

Honestly at 70yo Electrical would probably be one of the first things to upgrade. Check that you don’t have aluminum wires with cloth insulation.

Honestly I think a gut job is often easier than a patch job. I’d rather sheetrock a whole wall and tape seams than feather in a patch so it matches.